ABOUT

Lane Fredridkcon RhymeWeaver meter rhyme writing for kids picture books children story plot iamb anapest trochee dactyl dactylic iambic trochaic anapestic pentameter tetrameter octameter double elision enjambment rhymeweaver lane fredrickson cecily beasley

This site explains some fairly complicated stuff in a really simple way

 

meter rhyme writing for kids picture books children story plot iamb anapest trochee dactyl dactylic iambic trochaic anapestic pentameter tetrameter octameter double elision enjambment rhymeweaver lane fredrickson cecily beasleymeter rhyme writing for kids picture books children story plot iamb anapest trochee dactyl dactylic iambic trochaic anapestic pentameter tetrameter octameter double elision enjambment rhymeweaver lane fredrickson cecily beasleyEach of the above categories is broken down into simple mini-lessons that explain one basic concept. The concepts build, so if you choose one that looks good but some things don’t make sense, go to a lesson with a lower number and read up. I start with the basics, so if you choose a lesson that describes concepts you already know, then feel free to skip ahead.

There’s no point in dying of boredom.

 PICTUE BOOK OF THE MONTH

Starting in April of 2013, I’ll review one excellent picture book each month.  The review will analyze the meter, rhyme and story elements of that book.  So if the main chapters don’t have enough examples of the things you’re looking for, just click the PBOTM feature on the navigation bar.  You can browse each  PBOTM feature for more of the specific elements you’re interested in.  You can also sign up for this feature so that it comes to your inbox once a month.  

Some random and relevant stuff about me.

Cecily Beasley Watch Your Tongue Lane Fredrickson rhymeweaver rhyme meter metrical foot line variance poetry writing for kids iamb anapest tetrameter pentameter hexameter octameter plot story developmental slice of life episodic anecdotal My first picture book, Watch Your Tongue, Cecily Beasley, came out in September 2012. My second, MONSTER TROUBLE, will be out in late 2015. When I initially decided to write a rhyming picture book, I wasn’t sure how to go about it, or what the rules were. I joined a critique group and SCBWI (The Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators), took some poetry classes, went to workshops, and even got a degree in English along the way. A lot of people tried to discourage me from writing in rhyme. If you’re considering writing a rhyming picture book, some people will tell you that editors don’t like them, and that they are difficult or impossible to sell, and that agents won’t represent picture book authors. But mostly, people will tell you that you have to write “perfect” rhyme and meter to publish.  I wasn’t sure what “perfect” rhyme and meter were when I first heard this.  And there seemed to be a lot of conflicting opinions bouncing around about the elusive “perfect” rhyme and meter. It took a long time for me to realize that writing a picture book with rhyme and meter wasn’t impossible; there just wasn’t a really good resource that laid out all the details I needed to know in a way that was easy to understand.

 

This site has everything you need to know to write with rhyme and meter.

Lane Fredrickson Ghiloni RhymeWeaver RhymeWeaver.com Watch Your Tongue Cecily Beasley Writing Children's stories Rhyme and MeterWhile there are some excellent blogs and books about using rhyme and meter, this site breaks down rhyme and meter in a way that is image-based with very minimal text.  This makes both concepts easy to understand in a short period of time. I know which rules you can break and which ones you shouldn’t.  But more importantly, I can tell you the rules, not the myths that get passed around the water coolers.

RhymeWeaver is a pretty big site, but you don’t need to ingest it all in one sitting.  Take a lesson or two at a time.  Mull it over.  Then come back. This site is not a blog, so the information will be in exactly the same place every time you visit. Below are links to articles about RhymeWeaver.

SCBWI: The BLOG by Lee Wind

Tara Lazar’s Writing for Kids 

April Wayland on Author Amok

The Palm Beach Post

And thanks to Jo Deardon, Melanie Ellsworth, Penny Klostermann, William Peery, Leslie Gorin and Dawn Young who have pointed out mistakes or made suggestions so far.  Also, I might have missed someone who helped with typos, please remind me if I’ve missed you.

Lane@RhymeWeaver.com

And Good Luck!

RhymeWeaver.com