102A STRESSED Syllables
102A. STRESSED and UNstressed syllables.
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  • STRESSED syllables are pronounced slightly louder, for a slightly longer duration, and at a slightly higher pitch than UNstressed syllables.
The key to understanding Meter is understanding the difference between STRESSED and UNstressed syllables. Think of if like this:

hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision

When you say the word [NOSTRIL], you pronounce the [NOS] slightly louder, at a slightly higher pitch, and for a slightly longer duration than when you pronounce the [tril]. The first syllable [NOS] is STRESSED, and the second syllable [tril] is UNstressed.

hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision

 

hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision

 

NOSTRIL

A great word for illustrating the difference between STRESSED and UNstressed syllables is the word [PRESENT].  The word [PRESENT] is really two different words depending on which syllable you stress.  If you stress the first syllable, you get the word that means a gift.  But if you stress the second syllable, you get a word that is the root word for presentation.

hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision

$louder longer higher/yr
  • STRESSED syllables are pronounced slightly louder, for a slightly longer duration, and at a slightly higher pitch than UNstressed syllables
hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision
Oronyms can illustrate the difference between STRESSED and UNstressed syllables. The two oronyms on the right include exactly the same sounds in the same order, but the stress is on different syllables.
hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision
The words DICSUS and DISCUSS are also good for illustrating the difference between STRESSED and UNstressed syllables.

 

 

 

STRESSED & UNstressed syllables

The table below shows which syllables are STRESSED (boot) and which are UNstressed (ballet slipper) in Watch Your Cecily Beasley Watch Your Tongue Lane Fredrickson rhymeweaver
Tongue, Cecily Beasley
by Lane Fredrickson.

cecilybootballet

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  • STRESSED syllables are pronounced slightly louder, for a slightly longer duration, and at a slightly higher pitch than UNstressed syllables.

For more on STRESS see 102B STRESSED WORDS

To see how STRESSED and UNstressed syllables make up words see 103 Metrical Feet

hymeweaver rhyme meter rhythm writing for kids children's stories lines foot feet variance mixed meter pentameter octameter tetrameter iamb anapest trochee dactyl double rhyme stressed unstressed syllable double masculine feminine ending Lane Fredrickson end stopping stopped enjambment elision

Questions?  Comments?  Lane@RhymeWeaver.com

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